Linking exposure to polychlorinated biphenyls with fatty fish consumption and reduced fetal growth among Danish pregnant women: A cause for concern?

T. I. Halldorsson, I. Thorsdottir, H. M. Meltzer, F. Nielsen, S. F. Olsen

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

52 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

In a selected group of women from the Danish National Birth Cohort, the authors investigated the association between intake of fatty fish and plasma concentrations of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) on the one hand and the association between maternal PCB concentrations and fetal growth on the other. Of 70,183 women who filled in a food frequency questionnaire during 1996-2002, 100 nulliparous women aged 25-35 years with normal prepregnancy body mass index were selected according to their intake of fatty fish (low (0 meals/month, n = 34), medium (1-3 meals/month, n = 33), or high (≥4 meals/month, n = 33)). Women with a high intake of fatty fish had 50% (95% confidence interval (CI): 31, 72) higher plasma PCB concentrations than women with low intake. Maternal plasma PCB concentrations were inversely associated with birth weight and placental weight. The adjusted mean difference between the 75th and 25th PCB percentiles was -155 g (95% CI: -291, -19) for birth weight and -81 g (95% CI: -135, -26) for placental weight. These results support previous findings from this cohort, where fatty fish intake was inversely associated with fetal growth. Dietary recommendations often encourage weekly consumption of fatty fish. These results suggest that potential exposure to PCBs should be carefully considered before recommending such intakes among women of childbearing age.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)958-965
Number of pages8
JournalAmerican journal of Epidemiology
Volume168
Issue number8
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2008

Keywords

  • Birth weight
  • Denmark
  • Fatty acids
  • Fishes
  • Polychlorinated biphenyls
  • Pregnancy
  • Seafood
  • omega-3

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